Traveling the Road to Hana in Maui

If you go to Hawaii, one of the things you “must do” according to most travel guides is traveling the Road to Hana in Maui,

I have traveled the Road to Hana twice. The guides are right but there are some things to consider. To travel the Road to Hana, you should be aware of the following:

  • Time – it is at least an all day time commitment. I explain more about this below.
  • There are a lot of curves and stops. If you are prone to car sickness, take medication before you go.
  • It can be a harrowing drive. If that isn’t your thing, consider doing the Road to Hana as part of an organized tour.

I traveled the road once via organized tour and once we drove it on our own. I enjoyed it both ways. With the tour, our driver took care of the harrowing roads. He also told us where all of the best views were. When we went by ourselves, we used an app on my phone to find the sites while going at our own leisurely pace.

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RoadtoHana
The Three Bears Waterfall along the Road to Hana.

Traveling the Road to Hana in Maui

Background Information

The Road to Hana, or the Hana Highway, is a stretch of highway that spans over 64 miles and connects Kahului to the town of Hana on the east side of Maui. It then continues on to Kipahulu as Highway Route 31.

If you drive the highway uninterrupted, I’ve read that it should take about two and a half hours to complete. It is highly unlikely that you will ever travel it uninterrupted as a tourist because the highway is very winding and narrow. There is also so much to see along the way that will keeping you stopping and starting throughout the trip.

The Road to Hana passes over 59 bridges, many of which are concrete and steel dating back to 1910. Most are only one lane wide. There are also approximately 620 curves along Route 360 from east of Kahului to Hana. Most of these curves are through lush, tropical rain forest. Because of the curves, it’s a good idea to consider motion sickness meds before traveling on the Road to Hana if you’re prone to that ailment.

So if the highway is so winding and stressful, why do people travel along it?

Because it is the route required to see many amazing ocean views, pretty waterfalls, lava tubes and a black sand beach. All of these make it worth the drive or ride.

Regardless of whether you drive the Road to Hana yourself or go as part of a tour, it is a full day trip from the west side of the island, where I stayed both times. We left in the early morning and returned after sunset. If you prefer, you could also break the trip into two days and book a room in the town of Hana for one night. This is a good option if you want to take more time to explore and do the driving over two days.

Don’t Forget the App if you Travel the Road to Hana in Maui on Your Own

The key to traveling the road on our own was to download an app with a narrated audio guide of the road so we did not miss any of the hidden gems. Gypsy Guide or Shaka Guides are both good options and they are available for a nominal cost on the Apple and Google platforms. The audio can be stopped and started as needed and is also available offline so you can download the information and play it without having to worry about having cell service. Make sure to bring your phone charger with you though so you have plenty of battery for the guided audio tour and for taking lots of pictures!

There are so many opportunities to take beautiful photos along the way. The audio guide will alert you when a landmark possibly worth stopping at is approaching and it’s up to you to decide whether to listen. I recommend at least stopping briefly to check most of the landmarks out. You’re on vacation after all so why not?

Below are some of my favorite stops from my travels along the highway.

Garden of Eden Arboretum and Botanical Garden

The Garden of Eden Arboretum and Botanical Garden is located at mile market 10.5 on the Road to Hana,. It includes 26 acres and more than 700 species of plants. It has the most varied collection of plants in Hawaii. The garden features a platform where visitors can see Keopuka Rock, also known as the Jurassic Rock because it appeared in the opening sequence of Jurassic Park.

Visitors can also get close up views of the Rainbow Gum trees in the Garden of Eden Arboretum and Botanical Garden. These trees look may look like they’ve been painted on the the colors are all natural. The trees shed their bark each year, showing a bright green bark underneath. Over time, the bright green bark darkens to orange, maroon, blue and purple tones.

Garden of Eden in Maui Jurassic Rock in Maui Rainbow Gum Tree Road to Hana Maui Rainbow Gum Tree in Maui

The chicken below was the first living thing to greet us when we got off the bus to get a closer look at the Rainbow Gum trees on our tour. Although he looked ready to chase me back onto the bus, he quickly lost interest and we peacefully went our separate ways.

Traveling the Road to Hana in Maui

Upper Waikani Falls (aka The Three Bears)

These falls are very popular because they’re easy to see from the road.

They are located at mile marker 19.6. Most people snap a photo and drive off because there are few places to stop and park. There is parking 1/10 mile past the falls. You will have to walk back along the narrow road with no shoulder. When these falls are at a safe flow rate (like in the photos) you can take a short hike down from the road and swim.

Wai’anapanapa State Park

Wai’anapanapa State Park at mile marker 32 is best known for its black sand beach named Pa’iloa. The beach is actually more rocky than it is sandy and is small with a ocean cave on the east side that can be traveled through to the ocean. There’s also a naturally made lava arch in the water.

Wai'anapanapa State Park in Maui Black Sand Beach in Maui

Palapala Ho’omau Church

This church was built in 1857 and still stands along Maui’s lush coastline. It is the burial ground of prominent aviator, inventor, explorer, author and activist Charles Lindbergh.

Palapala Ho'omau Church in Maui

When I visited the church, there was a herd of horses that lived in the field next to the church. I wasn’t all that interested in the grave and while I hung out waiting for the rest of our tour to come back from the grave, the bus driver and I passed our time by playing with the horses. We would give them a mint for a smile. These horses undoubtedly have the best smelling breath on the island. The photo below is one of my favorite from my trip traveling the Road the Hana in Maui in 2013.

Mints for a Smile in Maui

I have so many photos from the Road to Hana. It is impossible to pinpoint which mile market they were all taken at. I am going to share a few more of my favorites below. No mile marker info available. This is really the key to traveling the Road to Hana in Maui. Take your time, enjoy the views and soak in the experience.

You won’t regret it!

Views while traveling the Road to Hana in Maui

An arch over the ocean traveling the Road to Hana in Maui

Interested in reading more about my favorite place in the world? You can check out some of my other Hawaiian adventures here and here.

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Meet Carmen

I’m Carmen, the founder of this blog and the Vicariously Through You community. I am so glad you’re here!

I currently live in Chicago, IL, USA with my Maltipoo pup, Stella. I am 40-something, single and do not have any children.

When I am not working on this blog and growing the Vicariously Through You community, I work as a Financial Analyst. In my free time, I travel as often as I can, often as a solo traveler. I enjoy rainy days, plain green tea, Chicago Cubs baseball and books with happy endings.

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